School of Professional Counseling

School of Professional Counseling


The mission of the Lindsey Wilson College School of Professional Counseling is to provide a practitioner-based, community-centered, student-focused mental-health preparation program hallmarked by academic integrity, professional competence, and sound ethical principles. The School of Professional Counseling partners with community colleges and mental health agencies in Appalachia and across five states to provide the undergraduate degree in Human Services & Counseling and the graduate degree in Counseling & Human Development with a specialization in Mental Health Counseling.

Programs

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Services & Counseling is an interdisciplinary program comprised of course work in psychology, sociology and social work in combination with broad-based general education courses. (Most human services & counseling course work is designated by an "HS" prefix.) Each course is taught by faculty with advanced degrees and experience in the course content area. Practicum experiences will equip the student with the skills to enter a variety of work settings.

The Master of Education in Counseling and Human Development is a broad-based generalist degree that exposes students to a variety of skills in mental health counseling. The program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) standards. CACREP is an independent non-profit organization, recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), which grants accredited status to graduate-level programs in the professional counseling field. The master's degree in Counseling and Human Development with specialization in Mental Health Counseling has been accredited by CACREP since 1996, indicating that it has met or exceeded CACREP standards for counselor preparation.

The program requires a minimum of sixty (60) semester hours. Thirty-nine (39) hours from nine (9) core areas provide foundation course work and clinical experience; in addition to twenty one (21) hours of specialty requirements in mental health counseling provide training in specific areas of counseling techniques and practice.

The Doctoral degree in Counselor Education & Supervision (CES) prepares students for leadership positions within the counseling profession. The CES program is a 72 credit hour Ph.D. program that is designed to meet the needs of working adults by providing a face-to-face learning environment in a convenient weekend format. Emphasizing a unique combination of scholarship, real-world application, and technology, the CES program will challenge and prepare students for employment as counselors, supervisors, educators, researchers, and leaders in the counseling profession. Classes meet monthly at the A.P. White campus in Columbia, KY. Monthly meetings are bridged with online learning opportunities.

The curriculum includes nine (9) credits in theory and assessment, nine (9) credits in teaching and pedagogy, nine (9) credits in academic leadership, nine (9) credits in mental health administration and advocacy, nine (9) credits in internship, eighteen (18) credits in research, and nine (9) credits of dissertation.

School of Professional Counseling
Community Campus Class Schedule
HS & CHD Programs 2017-2018

Fall 2017 Spring 2018 Summer 2018
Module 1A
August 25-26
September 8-9
September 22-23
October 6 (Finals)
Module 1A
January 19-20
February 2-3
February 16-17
March 2 (Finals)
Module 1A
May 11-12
May 25-26
June 8-9
June 22 (Finals)
Module 1B
September 1-2
September 15-16
September 29-30
October 7 (Finals)
Module 1B
January 26-27
February 9-10
February 23-24
March 3 (Finals)
Module 1B
May 18-19
June 1-2
June 15-16
June 23 (Finals)
SPC Day
Module 2A
October 13-14
October 27-28
November 10-11
December 1 (Finals)
Module 2A
March 9-10
March 23-24
April 13-14
May 4 (Finals)
Module 2A
June 29-30
July 13-14
July 27-28
August 10 (Finals)
Module 2B
October 20-21
November 3-4
November 17-18
December 2 (Finals)
Module 2B
March 16-17
April 6-7
April 20-21
May 5 (Finals)
Module 2B
July 6-7
July 20-21
August 3-4
August 11 (Finals)


School of Professional Counseling
CES Program Schedule 2017-2018

Fall 2017

2015 Cohorts

September 1-2 (1b)
September 29-30 (1b)
October 27-28 (2a)
December 102 (2a/b)

2016 & 2017 Cohorts

August 25-26 (1a)
September 22-23 (1a)
October 20-21 (2b)
November 17-18 (2b)

Spring 2018

January 26-27 (1b)
February 23-24 (1b)
March 23-24 (2a)
May 4-5 (2a/b)
January 19-20 (1a)
February 16-17 (1a)
March 16-17 (2b)
April 20-21 (2b)

Summer 2018

May 18-19 (1b)
June 15-16 (1b)
July 13-14 (2a)
July 27-28 (2a)
May 11-12 (1a)
June 8-9 (1a)
July 6-7 (2b)
August 3-4 (2b)
Approved by the SPC faculty - March 3, 2008

The School of Professional Counseling (SPC) is founded on the Core Values of HONESTY, FAIRNESS, RESPECT, RESPONSIBILITY, and COMPASSION.

Everyone within SPC strives to reflect these values when interacting with one another including faculty, students, supervisors, and clients.

As part of SPC's commitment to the standards set by the Council on Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), we promote both the personal and professional growth of our students as part of the counselor preparation process. Therefore, students may be expected to "stretch themselves" in various areas of their personal and professional development throughout the program.

Interactions with Others

Overall, exercise the Golden Rule: treat others the way you wish to be treated.

  1. Adhere to the American Counseling Association Code of Ethics. In particular, maintain the privacy and confidentiality of others.
  2. Present yourself in a way of which you and others would be proud. As a student, you represent Lindsey Wilson College's School of Professional Counseling.
  3. Be courteous and polite (e.g., please and thank you).
  4. Refer to persons in authority as Dr., Mr., Mrs., or Ms. until you are told otherwise.
  5. Be friendly and approachable.
  6. Have a positive attitude.
  7. Avoid offensive language (e.g., cursing).
  8. Avoid interrupting someone who is talking. (Note: In a counseling session, interrupting may be appropriate.)
  9. Say what you mean. Avoid sarcasm.
  10. Be sensitive to those who are different from you. Avoid bias, prejudice or lack of fairness towards others.
  11. Be safe. Avoid any behavior that puts yourself or others at risk or fails to protect the safety and well-being of yourself or others.

Accepting Feedback from Others

  1. Be open to feedback. Ask for it from others.
  2. Know that the individual providing the feedback wants you to improve and grow.
  3. Avoid reacting defensively or negatively.
  4. Follow through with any suggestions given from an instructor or supervisor and helpful and appropriate ones of a peer.
  5. Ask questions if you do not understand the feedback.

Classroom Behavior

  1. Be prepared for class. Remember to bring all the items you will need.
  2. Be on time for class. In fact, be a few minutes early so you are ready to go when class starts.
  3. Return from breaks and lunch on time.
  4. Stay the entire class time.
  5. Turn off your cell phone or pager unless you have the instructor's permission ahead of time and in this case, put the device on vibrate.
  6. Do not attend class under the influence of any substances. For instance, because it affects your behavior, it is inappropriate to have an alcoholic beverage at lunch and then attend class afterwards.
  7. Have good, clean hygiene and dress appropriately. Consider the impression you give to others. For example, you probably wish to avoid clothing that is extremely tight, is revealing/provocative, or has disparaging writing on it. When giving a presentation in class, dress professionally (see Professional Dress section below).
  8. Pay attention while in class and avoid behavior that is disruptive or distracting to the instructor and other students such as talking to other students, passing notes, text-messaging, or any other rude conduct. This also includes doing homework, reading a newspaper, or browsing the internet unless specifically directed by the instructor.
  9. Participate in individual and group class activities as well as class discussion.
  10. Ask permission before eating in class.
  11. Ask questions when confused or needing more information. Other students may also be confused.

Missing Class Time

Please note: students should be aware that professors and/or courses may differ in some ways related to the expectations in this section; thus, students would do well to check with their instructor when expectations are in conflict with one another.

  1. Avoid being tardy to class. If you are late, contact the instructor ahead of time if you are going to be several minutes late and give the reason why. Enter the classroom quietly without being a distraction to others. Wait for break to ask for any materials that were handed out at the beginning of class.
  2. Avoid leaving early from class. If you do need to leave early, contact the instructor ahead of time. As above, you are also responsible for getting any materials that were handed out in class including new assignments, handouts, and class notes. You can obtain these from another student in the course and some items may be available on ANGEL or from the instructor. It is your responsibility to get these items and not the instructor's to get these items.
  3. Avoid being absent from class. If you are absent, contact the instructor ahead of time or as soon as possible and give the reason why. You are responsible for turning in before class any assignments that are due that day. Some instructors allow you to do this via ANGEL or email. As above, you are also responsible for getting any materials that were handed out in class including new assignments, handouts, and class notes. You can obtain these from another student in the course and some items may be available on ANGEL or from the instructor. It is your responsibility to get these items and not the instructor's to get these items.
  4. Accept any consequences for being tardy, leaving early, or being absent from class including possible grade reduction and/or make-up work.

Class Assignments

  1. Complete all assignments in a timely and honest manner (i.e., do your own work). Accept any consequences for not doing so.
  2. Assume an assignment is to be done by yourself and without the help of others unless you are told otherwise.
  3. Ask questions when you are confused or do not understand the requirements of a particular assignment.
  4. Avoid procrastinating. This only hurts you.
  5. Print off assignments as early as possible to make time for printer problems.

Professional Dress

Whenever you wish to make an especially positive impression, you should dress professionally. In addition to exercising good hygiene and dressing appropriately as stated above (in the Classroom Behavior section), professional dress involves no shorts, denim (jeans), flip flops, or skirts far above the knee. In some environments, sandals and today's popular Capri pants may not be appropriate. Men may need to wear a tucked-in dress shirt with belt and tie. Finally, avoid chewing gum in professional situations.

Suggestions for Special Circumstances
Self-Care

Stress is a major concern for students as they struggle with a variety of academic, personal, financial, and social issues. Students face multiple pressures including full-time employment, marriage, children, aging parents, more challenging academics and degree requirements, extremely limited spare time, higher tuition, and loan repayments from previous degrees. These are all factors over which the student has little control. Since removing these stressors is usually not an option, the student needs to learn ways to cope with them while maintaining satisfactory progress in their academic program. If students do not successfully cope with stressors, negative consequences can occur physically, psychologically, socially, and academically through poor grades and/or attrition from their program. Suggested techniques for stress management and wellness include:

  1. Utilizing a variety of stress management techniques such as: thought stopping, refuting irrational ideas, worry control, body awareness, nutrition and exercise, breathing, meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, autogenics, goal setting and time management, assertiveness training, visualization/imagery, and the relaxation response.
  2. Spending time with supportive groups, such as family, friends or a significant other.
  3. Allowing time for creative pursuits such as reading, journaling, enjoying music, etc.
  4. Seeking regular preventative health care (physical, dental).
  5. Scheduling some time to play!
  6. Maintaining a healthy and sufficient sleep cycle.
  7. Utilizing tools that promote personal resiliency, such as faith.
  8. Seeking counseling if you begin to feel overwhelmed.

Dealing with Conflict

  1. When you have a conflict or issue with another person, talk to that person directly about it.
  2. Focus on viable solutions to the conflict.
  3. Use "I" statements rather than "you" statements.
  4. Avoid blaming, name calling, accusing, projecting and being overly angry.
  5. Avoid gossiping about the individual. Gossiping can be defined as "idle talk or rumor, esp[ecially] about the personal or private affairs of others" (www.dictionary.com).
  6. It may be helpful to have a third party observe the interaction between yourself and the other person.

Giving Feedback to Others (This section adapted from class handout from Dr. Jan Holden.)

Some criteria for useful feedback:

  1. It is descriptive rather than evaluative. This reduces the likelihood of the individual reacting defensively.
  2. It is specific rather than general. This helps with understanding and clarity.
  3. It takes into account the needs of both the receiver and the giver of feedback.
  4. It is directed toward behavior which the receiver can do something about.
  5. It is best received if begun with an area(s) of strength followed, if appropriate, by area(s) of improvement or growth. Feedback that focuses perpetually on the negative fosters defensiveness, discouragement, and hostility rather than openness to the information.
  6. It is checked to insure clear communication. One way of doing this is having the receiver try to rephrase the feedback he or she received.
  7. Also, but may not be feasible in all situations:

  8. It is solicited, rather than imposed. Feedback is most useful, when the receiver asks for it.
  9. It is well-timed. Feedback is often most useful at the earliest opportunity after the given behavior.

Currect Students

The School of Professional Counseling provides numerous resources to support its students. These resources are largely web-based, using cutting edge technologies to communicate with students on key issues related to their professional development. Some of these tools include:

Blackboard
Designed with student learning in mind, ANGEL provides a rich set of tools that faculty use to support live classroom instruction. ANGEL provides support for online syllabi, documents and powerpoints, grade distribution, quizzes and exams, electronic submission of written assignments, and much more!

SPC Resource Center
The SPC Resource Center is an integration of ANGEL and Google Apps technologies that provides students access to mailing lists for the entire program, key information for academic and professional development, and much more. The resource center is accessible through all ANGEL courses provided by the School of Professional Counseling.

Students can access most resources through the myLWC Portal and adding the SPC Resource Center.

Katie Murrell Library

Student Handbook

Counciling Services

Associated Organizations

Institute for Advanced Learning

The mission of the Lindsey Wilson College School of Professional Counseling Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) is to support the mission of the School of Professional Counseling through enhancing academic integrity, professional competence, and sound ethical values for the faculty, staff, students, and alumni. In an effort to carry out these objectives, the institute will strive to:

  • Generate an environment for training in areas of best practices, avant-garde practices, and research.
  • Stimulate scholarly and public discussion and awareness of mental health issues.
  • Become a nationally-recognized center for professional development in counseling.
  • Make resources available to the counselors, students, alumni, and faculty of Lindsey Wilson College and the communities in which they serve both in Appalachia and the surrounding area.
  • Provide an environment in which the talents and skills of the School of Professional Counseling can be showcased and utilized for the advancement of the profession.
Our email address is jennifer.williamson@lindsey.edu. Follow us on facebook

FAQ

  1. When can I start?
    • New undergraduate (BA) cohorts start each fall semester, typically beginning classes in late August. . If you will have 60 credit hours from KCTCS or another accredited college by the end of the summer semester, you are eligible to apply for admission. The application process is under way. Please see the Site Enrollment Coordinator to start your application and financial aid process.

  2. Is financial aid available?
    • Because Lindsey Wilson is a private institution, we offer financial aid in the form of additional grant money not offered by public institutions. Other forms of financial aid include the Pell Grant, College Access Program (CAP) grant and Kentucky Tuition Grant (KTG). Students are also eligible for Stafford loans, both subsidized and unsubsidized.

      STUDENTS SHOULD APPLY TO MAXIMIZE THEIR FREE-MONEY OPPORTUNITIES.

      Students may also apply for:
      PHI THETA KAPPA Scholarship
      KCTCS EMPLOYEE Scholarship (Full-time employees of KCTCS)

  3. What is the format of the courses?
    • Class schedules are arranged to accommodate students with work and family commitments. For community campus sites, classes are offered in a weekend format. The weekend schedule for Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia sites is Fridays from 4:00-9:00 pm and Saturdays from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. For sites in Ohio, the weekend schedule is Fridays from 4:00-9:15 Fridays and Saturdays from 9:00 am - 4:15 pm. All schedules include a lunch break, which is 50 minutes at Virginia sties, and one hour at other sites. Classes should meet during the posted hours, allowing for a 10‑15 minute break every 60‑90 minutes. Any exceptions to the standard schedule are available from the Site Enrollment Coordinator for the particular community campus site. For undergraduate classes on The Columbia campus, classes are available in the following formats: semester-long; eight-week modular evening classes; winter intercession; and summer session. Graduate classes in the SPC on the Columbia campus are scheduled for evenings.

  4. How hard is it to apply?
    • We make the registration process quick and easy by using forms that can be completed in a matter of minutes. The Site Enrollment Coordinator, who is located on site, is also available to help students complete the forms, both for financial aid and enrollment. The coordinator will also travel to the working student so that he or she will not have to lose time and money by leaving his or her job site. We make the registration process quick and easy by using forms that can be completed in a matter of minutes.

  5. Are Lindsey Wilson College School of Professional Counseling Programs accredited?
    • Lindsey Wilson College is accredited by the Commission on College of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the Associate of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Education and Doctoral Degrees. Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501). The master's program is accredited through the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Both of these are the highest form of accreditation that can be obtained by a college or university. Both programs also meet accreditation curriculum requirements for the Certified Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (CADC). Additionally, LWC is the only School of Professional Counseling of its kind in the United States.

LWC Policies

For more information on LWC policies, please refer to the LWC Student Handbook as well as the relevant Graduate or Undergraduate SPC Student Handbook. SPC students should refer to their SPC Student Handbooks for policies relating to community campus students.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is essential to the existence of an academic community. Every student is responsible for fostering a culture of academic honesty, and for maintaining the integrity and academic reputation of Lindsey Wilson College. Maintaining a culture that supports learning and growth requires that each student make a commitment to the fundamental academic values: honesty, integrity, responsibility, trust, respect for self and others, fairness and justice.

To foster commitment to academic integrity, faculty are asked to require each student to place and sign the following Honor Code on tests, exams and other assignments as appropriate: On my honor as a student, I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this assignment/exam.

Violations of the academic integrity policy include cheating, plagiarism or lying about academic matters. Plagiarism is defined as any use of another writer's words, concepts, or sequence of ideas without acknowledging that writer by the use of proper documentation. Not only the direct quotation of another writer's words, but also any paraphrase or summary of another writer's concepts or ideas without documentation is plagiarizing that writer's materials. Academic dishonesty is a profoundly serious offense because it involved an act of fraud that jeopardizes genuine efforts by faculty and students to teach and learn together. It is not tolerated at Lindsey Wilson College.

Students who are determined to have plagiarized an assignment or otherwise cheated in their academic work or examinations may expect an "F" for the activity in question or an "F" for the course, at the discretion of the instructor. All incidents of cheating or plagiarism are reported by the instructor to the Academic Affairs Office along with copies of all relevant materials. Each instance of cheating or plagiarism is counted separately. A student who cheats or plagiarizes in two assignments or tests during the same semester will be deemed guilty of two offenses. If the evidence is unclear, or if a second offense occurs, the VP for Academic Affairs or Associate Dean will work in cooperation with the Dean of Students to move the student before the campus Judicial Board for review. Violations will ordinarily result in disciplinary suspension or expulsion from the College, depending on the severity of the violation involved. Note: The College has purchased Turnitin.com, a web product used to detect plagiarized documents.

Questioning a Grade - The Student Academic Complaint Policy

A student, who wishes to question an assignment grade, or other academic issue, should follow the procedure below:

  1. Whenever possible, the student will first go to the faculty member who has assigned the disputed grade. Complaints regarding grades should be made within seven (7) days of receipt of the disputed grade and, if possible, will be decided by the faculty member within seven (7) days of receipt. If the disputed grade is the final grade for the course, "receipt" is defined by when the final grade is posted online by the registrar. (Please refer to the next section for appealing a final grade.)
  2. Unless there are extenuating circumstances, the student may, within seven (7) days request in writing a review of such decision by the Chair of the division in which the grade was assigned. Upon receipt of such request, that Chair will direct the faculty member and the student to each submit, within seven (7) days, if possible, a written account of the incident, providing specific information as to the nature of the dispute.
  3. Upon receipt of these written accounts, the Chair will meet, if possible, within seven (7) days with the faculty member and the student in an effort to resolve the dispute and will render his or her decision in writing.
  4. If either the student or the faculty member desires to appeal the decision of the Division Chair, the student or faculty member may, within seven (7) days by written request to the chair, ask that the matter be reviewed by a Grade Appeals Panel convened by the Academic Affairs Office.
  5. If the disputed grade is assigned at the end of a fall or spring semester and the student and faculty member cannot meet to resolve the issue, the student should contact the faculty member by e-mail within seven (7) days of receipt of the disputed grade. If the issue cannot be resolved by e-mail within the time limit, steps 2, 3 and 4 of the appeal may extend into the beginning of the semester immediately following receipt of the disputed grade by following the timeline above.
A student who wishes to question a final grade should follow the procedure below:
  1. Confer with the faculty member who assigned the disputed grade.
  2. If the disputed grade cannot be resolved, a written request for a grade appeal must be submitted to the Academic Affairs Office before the first day of the semester following the one in which the grade was issued. The written request must include the specific basis for the appeal.
  3. The Academic Affairs Office will convene a Grade Appeals Panel, comprised of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Associate Academic Dean, and the chair of the academic unit which houses the course for which the grade is appealed. If one of the members is the faculty member who issued the grade, an alternate will be appointed. The student and the faculty member may appear separately before the panel to explain their positions. The hearing is non-adversarial. Neither the faculty member nor the student may be accompanied by other individuals to the meeting of the Grade Appeals Panel. The Grade Appeals Panel will notify the student of its decision, if possible, within seven (7) days of the meeting.

Policy for Verification of Student Identity and Protection of Privacy

In compliance with United States Federal Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA), Public Law 110-315, all credit-bearing courses and programs offered through distance learning methods must verify that the student who registers for a distance education course or program is the same student who participates in and completes the course or program and receives academic credit. One or more of the following methods must be used:

  • A secure login and pass code
  • Proctored examinations; and/or
  • Remote proctoring of one of more examinations using Tegrity or other technologies

Verification of student identity in distance learning must protect the privacy of student information. Personally identifiable information collected by the College may be used, at the discretion of the institution, as the basis for identity verification. For instance, a student requesting that their learning system password be reset may be asked to provide two or more pieces of information for comparison with data on file. It is a violation of College policy for a student to give his or her password to another student.

Detailed information on privacy may be located at: /media/319883/Online%20Services%20Privacy%20Policy%204.20.12.pdf

Institutional Review Board (IRB) Policies

The Lindsey Wilson College Institutional Review Board (IRB) safeguards the rights and welfare of human participants in research and other research activities. Lindsey Wilson College faculty, staff, and students, which comprise its academic unites, and facilities, are subject to the IRB policies. This includes any research for which a research agreement (e.g. MOU) identifies Lindsey Wilson College Institutional Review Board (IRB) as the IRB of record. All student-led human subject research mush have a LWC faculty sponsor. All faculty members and students conducting human subject research are required to submit documentation of training on research involving human subjects that has been completed within two years of the onset of the proposed research. Online training is available at http://php.nihtraining.com/users/login.php.

Statement on Learning/Physical Disabilities

Lindsey Wilson College accepts students with learning disabilities and provides reasonable accommodation to help them be successful. Depending on the nature of the disability, some students may need to take a lighter course load and may need more than four years to graduate. Students needing accommodation should apply as early as possible, usually before May 15. Immediately after acceptance, students need to identify and document the nature of their disabilities. It is the responsibility of the student to provide to the College appropriate materials documenting the learning disability, usually a recent high school Individualized Education Program (IEP) and results from testing done by a psychologist, psychiatrist, or qualified, licensed person. The College does not provide assessment services for students who may be learning disabled. Although LWC provides limited personal counseling for all students, the College does not have structured programs available for students with emotional or behavioral disabilities. For more information, call Ben Martin at 270-384-7479.

Academic Success Center

The Academic Success Center, located in the Everett Building, offers peer tutoring to aid students in completing class assignments, preparing for exams and improving their understanding of content covered in a particular course. In addition, computers are available for student use.

Students are encouraged to utilize this Center as a resource for improving study strategies and reading techniques. The Center also offers assistance with other academic problems resulting from documented learning disabilities. All services are free of charge to all Lindsey Wilson College students (students with learning disabilities are responsible for providing documentation from an appropriate outside professional source such as a professional evaluation or school IEP). Please contact Maretta Garner, Tutor Coordinator at 384-8037 for further information and assistance.

Writing Center and Mathematics Center

The Writing Center (located in the Slider Humanities & Fine Arts Building), and the Mathematics Center (located in the Fugitte Science Building) are available for specialized tutoring at no charge to students. Please contact Jared Odd, Writing Center Coordinator, at 384-8209 or Linda Kessler, Math Tutor Coordinator, at 384-8115 for further information and assistance.

Final Exams

Final Exams for day classes are scheduled for the Fall 2012 semester on December 10-14 and May 6-10 for the Spring 2013 semester. The academic calendar, which contains the schedule for finals, is in the College Catalog and course schedule listing. Please make any necessary flight arrangements after the final exam week. Students will not be permitted to take early finals unless extenuating circumstances exist. "Extenuating circumstance" means illness, a verified family emergency or participation in officially sponsored travel in support of an event arranged by the College. Travel arrangements must be made in sufficient time that tickets may be obtained after final exams and the semester is officially over. All requests for early finals must be made in person to the Academic Affairs Office.

Email Policy

All Lindsey Wilson College students are required to communicate with LWC faculty and staff via LWC (Lindsey.edu) email addresses only. Alternative email addresses should not be used when communicating with LWC faculty and staff.

Cell Phone Policy

Student cell phones will be off during class time unless prior arrangement is made with the instructor.

Adding/Dropping a Course

Students enrolled in the following courses cannot drop these classes during the semester: READ 0713, 0723, 0733, 0903, 1013 and 1023; STSK 1003; ENGL 0903 and 0904; and ESL 0803, 0804 and 0854.

For undergraduate classes at the Columbia campus, adding a course, dropping a course, or changing from one section of a course to another section of the same course requires the approval of the advisor and the instructor for each course involved as indicated on the Add/Drop Form. The change must be reported to the Business Office and the Registrar's Office on an Add/Drop Form, which may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. For AIM courses, adding a course, dropping a course, or changing from one section of a course to another section of the same course requires the approval of the Director of the Evening Program. For courses taught at Community sites, adding a course, dropping a course, or changing from one section of a course to another section of the same course requires the approval of the Site Coordinator for the campus. Permission to add courses will not be given after the last date for late registration. Authorization for dropping a course will not be approved after more than 75% of the instructional days for a course are completed, as outlined below:

Course

Deadline

Submitted by the Student to

Columbia undergraduate and
graduate full semester courses

Not later than 30 days
before the end of the semester

Registrar

AIM courses

By the sixth week of class

Registrar

Courses at Community Campuses

By the third weekend of class

Site Coordinator or the Registrar


If changes are not properly approved and officially reported as stated above, students will receive a grade of F in the courses for which they are officially registered, and they will be charged for all such courses. Students will not receive credit for changed or added courses unless they officially register for those courses.


Community Campus Locations

LWC Center for Excellence in Research

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CACREP

Accreditation

The master of education in counseling and human development is CACREP-accredited and meets the academic licensure requirements for Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. Each state licensing board sets the standards for professional counselors to follow in applying, qualifying, and maintaining licensure as a counselor. This includes additional supervised post-master professional experience, a passing score on a licensing exam, and other requirements. For the states in which the program is currently offered (Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, and Tennessee) the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) credentialing exam is accepted as the licensing exam. Links to licensure-related resources can be found in the School of Professional Counseling Resource Center.