MOBILE SITE
Click to access the LWC Homepage!
print e-mail
Course Descriptions

HIST

1033 -- U. S. History: 1492 to 1865 -- 3 credit hours
Surveys the social, economic, cultural, and political development of the United States from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War.  Focuses on topics such as early exploration, the American Revolution, the early development of American democracy, the Old South and slavery, Westward expansion, and the Civil War.  Course rotation: Fall.  General Education: Core -- Inquiry & Analysis.

1043 -- U.S. History: 1865 to Present -- 3 credit hours
Surveys the social, economic, cultural, and political development of the United States from the Reconstruction Era to the recent past.  Focuses on topics such as the world wars, the Great Depression and New Deal, the Cold War, Vietnam, and Watergate.  Course rotation: Spring.  General Education: Core -- Inquiry & Analysis.

2233 -- World Civilization I: Prehistory to 1500 -- 3 credit hours
Studies the development of civilization in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas down to the age of European colonialism.  Primary emphasis is given to the unique social and cultural characteristics of each civilization.  Course rotation: Fall.  General Education: Core -- Engaged Local & Global Citizenship.

2243 -- World Civilization II: 1500 to Present -- 3 credit hours
Studies the development of civilization throughout the world from the beginning of the 16th century to the present.  The evolution of cultures and the progress of major social, economic, political, and intellectual trends are studied as a means of understanding the modern world.  Course rotation: Spring.  General Education: Core -- Application & Integration of Knowledge.

3033 -- Colonial America -- 3 credit hours
Examines American political, social, cultural, and economic development to 1776.  Includes topics such as early exploration, Native American contact, race, and the imperial relationship. Prerequisite: HIST 1033 or   instructor's permission.  General Education: Intermediate -- Communication; Intermediate -- Inquiry & Analysis.

3053 -- Age of Jackson -- 3 credit hours
Studies the Age of Andrew Jackson from political and social/cultural perspectives.  Special attention is given to the rise of Jacksonian democracy and its impact on American politics. Prerequisite: HIST 1033 or instructor's permission.  General Education: Intermediate -- Communication; Intermediate -- Inquiry & Analysis.

3063 -- A History of the Old South -- 3 credit hours
Examines the social, economic, cultural, and political development of the Antebellum South.  Focuses on topics such as slavery, the pro-slavery argument, the development of Southern nationalism, and plantation life.  Prerequisite: HIST 1033 or instructor's permission.

3073 -- Civil War & Reconstruction -- 3 credit hours
Examines the Civil War Era of American history. Focuses on the sectional conflict preceding secession, the political and military aspects of the Civil War, and the political and social issues involved in Reconstruction.  Prerequisites: HIST 1033 and HIST 1043 or instructor's permission.

3093 -- Diplomatic History of the United States -- 3 credit hours
Focuses on the major problems and issues in American foreign policy from independence to the present.  Special attention is given to the isolationist tradition, expansionism, American imperialism, the United States' entry into the world wars, and the Cold War.  Prerequisite:  HIST 1033 or HIST 1043 or instructor's permission.

3103 -- Kentucky Studies -- 3 credit hours
Examines the history, literature, geography, folklore, and culture of Kentucky.  Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.

3143 -- Women in the American Experience -- 3 credit hours
Studies the social, cultural, economic, and political forces shaping women's lives from the pre-Colonial period to the present.  This course will focus on the variety of women's experiences and examine the intersections of race, class, and ethnicity.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.

3233 -- Ancient History -- 3 credit hours
Focuses on the beginnings of civilization in the Near East, the development of Greek civilization, and the rise and decline of Roman civilization through A.D. 5th century.  Prerequisite: HIST 2233 or instructor's permission.

3243 -- Medieval Europe -- 3 credit hours
Studies the emergence and development of European civilization from the decline of Rome through the 14th century.  Prerequisite: HIST 2233 or instructor's permission.

3263 -- French Revolution & Napoleon -- 3 credit hours
This course provides a survey of the nature and significance of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods with special emphasis given to the social, economic, and political events leading up to the beginning of modern France.   Prerequisite: HIST 2243 or instructor's permission.

3303 -- Modern Europe Since 1789 -- 3 credit hours
Examines major aspects of Western European development since the French Revolution.  Prerequisite: HIST 2243 or instructor's permission.

3323 -- Revolution in the Modern World -- 3 credit hours
An analysis of revolution as a transforming force in the modern world beginning with the English Civil War and "Glorious Revolution" of the 17th century.  Emphasis is given to the development and impact of the French and Russian revolutions.  Prerequisite: HIST 2243 or instructor's permission.

3433 -- International History & Film -- 3 credit hours
Explores the relationship between history and film, in particular, how film can enhance one's understanding of the past. Incorporating written texts, emphasis will be placed on how films both illuminate and conceal basic historical truths and how the medium's demands can contribute to such ends.  Through related critical thinking exercises, students will work toward developing visual literacy.  Prerequisite: HIST 2233 or HIST 2243 or instructor's permission.

3633 -- Women in World History -- 3 credit hours
Studies the historical, social, cultural, economic and political forces shaping women's lives throughout history.  Focuses on the variety of women's experiences and examine the intersections of race, class, and ethnicity.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

4903 -- History Seminar -- 3 credit hours
A capstone course which emphasizes historical research and writing, intensive reading, discussion of selected historical topics in a seminar setting.  Prerequisites: Senior standing or instructor's permission and history or social science major.  General Education: Mastery -- Communication; Mastery -- Inquiry & Analysis.

 

 

POSC

1003 -- United States Government -- 3 credit hours
Introductory survey of the American political system, including study of the philosophical basis of American government, the three branches of the federal government, federal-state relations, civil rights, political parties, campaigns, the role of the media, and lobby groups.  Course rotation: All semesters.  General Education: Core -- Inquiry & Analysis.

2103 -- Modern and Contemporary Political Thought -- 3 credit hours
Political theorists from the 16th to the 20th century are used to examine a series of major questions (e.g., human nature, power, authority, justice, liberty, equality, and legitimacy) which are central to political theory and political science.  In addition, students will be introduced to the core modern ideologies (e.g. liberalism, conservatism, and socialism).  This course is discussion oriented and designed to develop the student's critical reading and thinking abilities.   Prerequisite:  POSC 1003.  Course rotation: Fall odd years.  General Education: Intermediate -- Communication.

2203 -- United States Congress -- 3 credit hours
Examines the role of the legislative branch in the American political system.  The focus is primarily on the U.S. Congress.  State legislatures including the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representation, the sources of legislative power, the institutions involved in formulating legislation, and the people who participate in the legislative process will also be discussed.  The role elections, leadership, and parties play in the legislative process will be examined.  Recommended for students contemplating a legislative internship.  Prerequisite:  POSC 1003.  Course rotation: Fall even years.

2213 -- International Relations -- 3 credit hours
An investigation of the basic factors in international politics, including the origin and nature of the state system; the concepts of sovereignty, diplomacy, and war; international conflicts and disputes; and the relationship of international politics to international economics in the conduct of foreign affairs. Prerequisite: POSC 1003.

2303 -- Comparative Politics -- 3 credit hours
This course provides an introduction to comparative politics.  It aims to provide students with the tools necessary to study politics and society in comparative perspective.  Within Political Science, the subfield of Comparative Politics is concerned with studying politics in countries outside the United States.  This course is designed to give students an introduction to processes of political and economic development both within and across countries around the world.  In the process, the issues raised will challenge students to think, analyze, and write with both creativity and rigor.  Prerequisite:  POSC 1003. 

2403 -- U.S. Foreign Policy -- 3 credit hours
A study of the formulation and implementation of American foreign policy.  Attention is devoted to how political institutions (President, Congress, bureaucracy, etc.) interact to produce foreign policy.  Major issues of American foreign policy, both past and present, are discussed, with particular emphasis since the events of September 11, 2001.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003. 

3103 -- United States Legislatures -- 3 credit hours
Examines the role of the legislative branch in the American political system.  The focus is primarily on the U.S. Congress.  State legislatures including the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representation, the sources of legislative power, the institutions involved in formulating legislation, and the people who participate in the legislative process will also be discussed.  The role elections, leadership and parties play in the legislative process will be examined.  Recommended for students contemplating a legislative internship.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003.  Course rotation: Spring even years.

3203 -- Classical Political Thought -- 3 credit hours
Selected political theorists from classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the renaissance are used to examine a series of major questions (e.g., human nature, power, authority, justice, and liberty) which are central to political theory and political science.  In addition, students are introduced to the origins of our Western political thought and culture.  This course is discussion oriented and designed to develop the student's critical reading and thinking abilities.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003.

3213 -- Public Policy -- 3 credit hours
A study of the development, implementation, and impact of government policies, with a primary focus on the United States.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003.

3503 -- Politics of the Middle East -- 3 credit hours
A study of the politics of the Middle East, with particular focus on the sources of conflict in the Middle East.  These sources include religion, colonialism and imperialism, great power rivalry, resource conflict, and levels of development.  These sources are applied to the variety of conflicts in the region, including intra-Arab disputes, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the notion of civilizational conflict between the West and Islam, and the implications for transformation in the Middle East.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003. 

3TX3 -- Topics in International Issues in Political Science -- 3 credit hours
May include the study of terrorism, political ideologies, the politics of the Soviet Union and Russia, and/or comparative politics.  This course may be repeated once for credit.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003. 

4103 -- American Political Thought -- 3 credit hours
Selected political thinkers from the history of American political thought are used to explore the core values and beliefs that define the American political system and culture.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003 and POSC 2103.  Course rotation: Fall odd years. 

4203 -- The American Presidency -- 3 credit hours
An examination of the nature and development of the presidency and its role in the American political system.  The presidency is defined broadly to include both the presidential office and the institutional structures in the White House and the Executive Office of the President that have grown up around it.  Prerequisite:  POSC 1003.  Course rotation:  Spring odd years.

4903 -- Capstone in Political Science -- 3 credit hours
A capstone course which emphasizes research and writing, intensive reading, and discussion of selected political topics in a seminar setting.  Prerequisites: POSC 1003 and senior standing or instructor's permission. 

4TX3 -- Topics in Political Science & Politics -- 3 credit hours
Includes the study of a variety of current issues in political science and politics.  May include the following topics:  civil liberties and civil rights; presidential elections; dictatorships and anti-democratic political systems; the politics of film; the politics and philosophy of Star Wars.   This course may be repeated once for credit.  Prerequisite: POSC 1003. 

PN00 -- Professional Internship in Political Science -- 3-12 credit hours
Required work experience in an occupational area related to student's interest or focus.  Students must have 120 clock hours worked and write a scholarly paper related to the work experience.  In addition, students must keep a reflective journal.  Grading:  Credit/No Credit. 

 

 

ECON

2023 -- Survey of Economic Issues -- 3 credit hours
A study of national and international economic issues such as market and command economic systems; agriculture subsidies; healthcare issues; green Gross Domestic Product and environmental pollution; Social Security; poverty; state of national economy; unemployment; inflation; budget deficit and national debt; the financial market; economics of higher education; feminist economic issues; regional economic integration; protectionism versus free trade; world poverty; developing countries' international debt; and the role of international institutions such as WTO, IMF and the World Bank.  Note: Students who have taken ECON 2043 or ECON 2033 may not take this course for credit.  Prerequisite: Mathematics course meeting/exceeding general education requirements, unless waiver requirements are met.  General Education: Core -- Inquiry & Analysis.

2033 -- Microeconomics -- 3 credit hours
A study of supply, demand, price, seller-market power, profit, consumer choice, specialization, efficiency, domestic and international trades, and distribution of income.  The role of middlemen, speculators, and the government in economy. Current economic controversies are discussed. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and MATH 1013, unless mathematics waiver requirements are met.  General Education: Core -- Inquiry & Analysis.

2043 -- Macroeconomics -- 3 credit hours
A study of inflation, unemployment, national income, booms and busts, government budget deficit, money, monetary and fiscal policies, specialization, efficiency, trade, currency exchange, and balance of payment with other nations.  Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and MATH 1013, unless mathematics waiver requirements are met.  General Education: Core -- Inquiry & Analysis.

3103 -- Money & Banking -- 3 credit hours
Discusses the role of money in the economy; the commercial banking system; nonbank financial institutions; the financial market; portfolio choices; interest rates; the Federal Reserve system and its monetary policies; international finance; monetary theories; and rational expectations and its implications for public policy.

3203 -- Statistics for Business & Economics -- 3 credit hours
A review of descriptive statistics. Sampling and sampling distribution, estimation and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression analysis and correlation, non-parametric methods, and time series and business forecasting.  Prerequisite: MATH 2203. 

 

 

SOCI

1003 -- Principles of Sociology -- 3 credit hours
Introduction to the structure of social life, culture, types of group interaction, social institutions, stratification, power relationships, and analysis of the process of social and cultural change.  Course rotation: All semesters.

 

GEOG

1003 -- World Regional Geography -- 3 credit hours
Introduction to the various cultural and political regions of the world.  Emphasis is placed on the physical aspects of each geographic region and upon the diversity within and between each region of our global society.  Course rotation: Fall and spring.

3003 -- Geography of North America -- 3 credit hours
A spatial study of the interaction of physical and cultural geographic characteristics in the United States and Canada in a present day context as well as from an historical perspective.

3103 -- Human Geography -- 3 credit hours
The systematic study of two of our world's main features of human behavior: culture and economy.  The first half of the class looks at items such as population, migration, religion and ethnicity around the world.  The second half of the class looks at items such as agriculture, industry, politics and urban patterns in our global society.

 

 

 

 



Feedback and CommentsSite MapDirections  
Every Student, Every Day
2008 Lindsey Wilson College
210 Lindsey Wilson St. Columbia, Ky 42728
Local: (270) 384-2126
Fax: (270) 384-8200
Toll Free: (800) 264-0138
e-mail: info@lindsey.edu